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Posts Tagged ‘Testing’

Picture 2Eighteen years ago, photographer John Terence Turner created this instant classic for Nike.  The shot captures a lone runner mid-stride in one shaft of light amidst the shadowed canyons of Seattle and features the brilliantly understated caption, or perhaps even encapsulation: “There is no finish line.”

I flashed back to this visual after listening to Mark Earl’s August 11 video clip on “3 Minute Ad Age.” Mark is now an author but as the ex-Head of Planning for Ogilvy London and Europe, he has some very intelligent viewpoints on marketing in this social age.

Primarily, he questions the wisdom of advertisers’ perpetual quest for “The Big Idea.”  Mark believes that it’s unrealistic to expect a single creative concept will span the incredible diversity of viewpoints in a global marketplace.  Life isn’t just multiple choice, it’s multiple solution as well.  So why should we place one big bet?  Wouldn’t it be smarter to lay down a number of little bets?

Scientists refer to the latter as ‘the iterative method’ while those of us who were liberal arts majors might be more inclined to just call it ‘common sense.’  How valuable would it be if we could get over our industry-wide predilection for polishing and instead, crank up the production machine and generate a number of good ideas, with the caveat that once we produced and shared them, we’d analyze their in-market impact?  We could test for things like sales results, engagement and favorability.  More importantly, we could then try to assimilate those results into actionable guidelines for future work.  It’s the equivalent of firing a cannon, seeing where the shell hits, and then making incremental adjustments to bring each subsequent shot closer and closer to your target.

Learn and apply: it’s a simple notion really.  Unfortunately, it’s far less simple to be honest about what we learn and disciplined with subsequent applications.  But we can try.

Because as the ad says, there is no finish line.  If there were, the Nike brand would still be about exhorting yourself toward physical self-improvement instead of evolving to the culture-shaping dynamo they’ve become.

By Dennis Ryan, CCO, Element 79
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In today’s New York Times, Stuart Elliott provides the back story on Tropicana’s ill-received packaging redesign.  This issue first came to my attention back around the New Year when my wife spotted it in our local grocery store and succinctly opined “Yuck.”  I knew right then they were in trouble…

The Old...  The New...  The Old, Now New.

The Old... The New... The Old, Now New.

Anyway, this story once again highlights the unprecedented power that access affords today’s consumers.  Through blogs and emails, Tropicana fans demanded the return of their familiar package and it’s easily-recognized-on-a-crowded-shelf Straw In Orange brand symbol.  They also didn’t shy from critiquing the ‘generic store brand’ feel of the rather flat new graphics.

In the spirit of full-disclosure, let me admit that I worked on this brand through a string of division President’s and CMO’s from 2001-2008, and that further, I’m not much of a fan of Pepsi’s recent and pricey product redesigns—with the notable exception of a much-improved Sierra Mist.  However, I kept my opinions to myself while a groundswell of others apparently didn’t.  And so, mere months into this very expensive process, Tropicana recognized the wisdom of embracing this public feedback.  And good for them.

Interestingly, their President, a UK transplant named Neil Campbell, cites the negative response from their most loyal consumers as key to the reversal, admitting “What we didn’t get was the passion this very loyal small group of consumers have. That wasn’t something that came out in the research.”

Of course it didn’t come out in the research.  Any practicing creative could tell you that.  Those of us who make a living dreaming up ideas quickly grow skeptical of the dodgy pseudoscience behind market testing and the mystifying faith too many clients put into their measurements of consumer opinions.  Somehow, this entire industry built its metrics around what people say, often in public among a group of peers.

I hate to be the bearer of bad news but people lie.  We all lie.  We lie all the time, for reasons good and bad, but the inescapable fact remains you can not put all of your faith in the veracity of peoples’ words and what they claim in a focus group.

Happily, the web’s mighty data engine now allows us to measure what people actually do and how they act in the real world, as opposed to the often groupthink statements they make while being interviewed in the windowless confines of focus group rooms. 

So while many will recognize this Tropicana incident as yet another cautionary tale about the ever-expanding role consumer influence has on brand marketing, we can also take away another critical lesson: we need to update our testing methods to take advantage of our easy-access to the real world, behavior-based data all around us.

You want to determine the relative merits of two marketing approaches?  Don’t make some mock-ups and hold a focus group–create rich media banners of both of them and run online test markets and see which one performs better out in the real world.  This type of production costs very little—and unlike animatics, the creative materials actually drive sales as they’re being tested.  Imagine that: faster, cheaper, and more accurate testing awaits all of us online…

Why exactly is anyone still debating this?

By Dennis Ryan, CCO, Element 79

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It's Not Quite This Simple...       

Sorry: It’s Not Quite This Simple…

So banner ads work.  Specifically, consumers exposed to banner ads are more likely to search for brand terms than those who aren’t. Display ads boost both paid and organic searches and clicks.

According to an article on MediaPost, the post-campaign lift numbers ran like this:

Automotive   144%    CPG   22%    Health   260%
News & Media   144%    Personal Finance   206%
Retail   69%    Travel & Tourism   274%
AVERAGE LIFT:   155
%
Source: comScore Ad Effectiveness Data, December 2008
 

So basically, these people spent twelve months and god knows how much money to learn… ADVERTISING WORKS!

Why is this news?  Does anyone in our business read this story and think “well, that’s a bit of a shocker”?

Sadly, experience says that too many do: too many marketing people lack faith in our business.  To me, that says they have either gotten too far away from the core of the advertising business…or they should get away now.

By Dennis Ryan, CCO, Element 79

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